Minond Blog | Health

NYC Chiropractor

by Jonathan F. Minond 6. March 2011 00:35

Dr. Michael Minond, NYC Chiropractor, based in Manhattan has successfully launched http://www.nyc-wellness-chiropractor.com his new website for chiropractic and overall wellness.

For years, Dr. Minond has been working to provide a natural healing experience for his patients. He believes in treating the Cause and not just the symptom of your problems, taking the aches and pains away for good.

Using a variety of advanced techniques, such as Applied Kinesiology to diagnose and treat.

I recommend checking the site out, signing up for the wellness newsletter, and scheduling a visit!

Tags: , , , ,

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Injury Healing - Part I

by Dr. Minond 8. August 2010 16:42

Injuries commonly treated in the office are related to the straining of muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The first stage of healing an injury, once it has occurred, is known as the reaction phase. This stage can last for up to seven days, depending on the extent of the injury and the healing process. During this time, there will be an increase in circulation in the area surrounding the injury, which leads to swelling, or edema. To limit the degree of damage caused by the injury, we usually recommend a method called RICE, which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.

  • Rest

    Be sure to rest the area that is injured. Continued activity will cause more damage, increasing the amount of swelling and tearing of cells.
  • Ice

    Ice in the form of cold packs will cause local contraction of blood vessels and reduce pain. Use ice for 15 minutes every hour, for four to five hours, immediately after sustaining an injury (never put ice directly on your skin). Then, continue to use ice four to five times a day for the next three days. If you suffer from Raynaud’s (hives from contact with ice), diabetes, or any vascular disease, do not use ice on your injury. Instead, place a cold cloth over the area of the injury and call for additional help.
  • Compression

    Wrapping the area of injury with an elastic wrap will reduce the amount of swelling. For example, if you have turned your ankle and it starts to swell, put an ice pack around the ankle and wrap the ankle and lower leg with an elastic bandage.
  • Elevation

    If it is possible, raise the injured area above the level of your body. Again, as an example, if the ankle is injured, raise your leg above your pelvis. Or, if the wrist is injured, support your arm above the height of the shoulder. Elevation allows gravity to help remove the swelling.

What happens during an injury?

An injury can cause blood vessels to break, initiating several chain reactions. A clot is formed from proteolytic enzymes released by cells called platelets. The body creates a clot, or mesh, where the vessels have become broken. The lymphatics, the ‘sewer system’ of our vascular system, become blocked with these clots. Pain-causing substances, known as bradykinins, are released due to the injury and cause vasodilation and increased permeability of local arterioles. Other factors are also released locally to breakdown severely damaged tissue and prevent infection.


During this phase, it is important to limit the amount of inflammation. Excessive inflammation can cause increased damage to the injured area. Controlling inflammation and speeding the recovery process requires more than just taking an anti-inflammatory drug. The body uses enzymes to help clear up damaged tissue. A good analogy is a multi-car accident on a large highway. The traffic is backed up for miles on the side of the accident, and on the other side people are looking at the accident. Removing the wrecked car from the road is the first thing that has to be done to re-open the roadway. Enzymes accomplish this in the body, but taking more of the right enzymes can speed up the removal of the damaged tissue and re-establish normal blood flow to and from the injury site.


If you suffer an injury, call the office as soon as possible to schedule an appointment and have the injury examined. Depending on what is found, nutritional supplements which can help speed the healing process may be suggested. Studies have shown that taking such supplements can reduce the time it takes to heal by up to 50%, with similar levels of reduction in pain and swelling.


Remember: The window for starting treatment is very short, and the course of recovery must be started as soon as possible, so don’t delay!


 

Applied Kinesiology is a diagnostic tool using the muscle structure of the body to aid in the examination of a patient. Its use allows immediate feedback to aid the doctor in making decisions on what type of care the patient needs.


10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags: , , ,

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Gary Fisher X-Caliber 29er

by Jonathan F. Minond 25. May 2010 00:31

Oh yes... You read it correct. That will be my new bike by this week's end!!!

Frame
Platinum Series 6066 butted & hydroformed aluminum, cold-forged dropouts, G2 29" Geometry
Wheels
Shimano M525 hubs, Bontrager Duster Disc 29 rims, Bontrager XDX tires
Componentry
SRAM X.9 front derailleur, SRAM X.7 rear derailleur, SRAM X.7 shifters, Shimano FC-M521 crank, Avid Juicy 3 hydraulic disc brakes
Suspension
Fox F80 RL 29, 80mm travel, custom G2 Geometry 51mm offset crown

Quite excited, the bike is significantly lighter than some others I tried, and the one I own. The biggest differences are that I am getting rid of full suspension which does nothing but slow me down on the terrains I ride. The large tire should also be lot's of fun, and garner a little more speed. The other main benefit from the tire size, is that it's the same diameter as 700c wheels, so I can accomidate a much more friendly road/commute/race tire to have on for regular city riding and long road trek's... especially becuase Michael now has a fast road bike, and will fly away from me anyway.

The bike is light, and felt great in the store, and now I've officially put it on hold, and will pick it up this weekend. I am sure I will post some more commentary once I physically own the bike and ride it around a bit.

My first ride will probably from the store back home to queens, with a little dump through the park (Forest Park) I am sure.

Tags:

Health | Personal | Biking

Savvy Sleeping

by Dr. Minond 21. May 2010 01:46

Savvy Sleeping

Lie down and be comfortable. Think about how to fall asleep. Some people are curled up in a ball; others sprawled out all over the bed. How do you feel when you get up? Refreshed and ready to go, or as though you have been in a fight?

The easy answer to poor sleep is that your mattress is too hard, too soft, or just worn out. Before we blame the mattress, futon or waterbed, let’s examine the position you sleep in.

When you lie down, your muscles should be relaxed. This makes sense. However, the position that you lie in can stop many of your muscles from relaxing evenly. This results in constant pulling on your spine while you are recumbent. When you get up, these muscles are sore because they have work all night.

Proper Leg Position

Let’s start with you lying on your side. The first important position is the angle of your legs. The more problems you have with your pelvis and lower back, the more important becomes the specific the angle of your legs. In other words, the healthier you are, the greater the angle at which you can keep your legs. Rub the muscles on both sides of the lower back, these should be soft. If they are tender or contracted, raise or lower your legs to find the position where these muscles are relaxed. This is especially important if you have any low back problems. Sleeping for hours with these muscles contracted just aggravates the local injury, severely retarding the healing process.

Rub the muscle on the outside of your pelvis. If this is sore, place a pillow between your legs. The correct height will dramatically reduce the tenderness over this muscle.

If you lie on your back when you fall asleep, have someone reach in under your back and rub the muscles beside the spine. If these are tender, place a small pillow under the knees and see if this reduces the tenderness. This is more common in people who are sleeping on extremely hard mattresses.

Pillow Positioning

The next thing to check is the height of your pillow. The function of the pillow is to support you next and head. The height depends on whether you sleep on your back or on your side. On your side, the pillow has to fill the space from the tip of your shoulder to your neck.

Neck Support

Lie on your side with your pillow under your neck. Reach up and rub the muscles on the front and side of your neck. If these are tender, your pillow needs to be altered. It is just as bad to be too high as to be too low. If you view the spine from the side, the neck should be supported in a direct line with the back. The head should not angle down or up.

Find a pillow or combination of pillows that supports your neck so that there is little to no tenderness in the neck muscles.

If you lie on your back to sleep, you will need less support than when you are on your side. If you have your pillow height elevated above the optimum, you will have increased contractions in these same neck muscles.

Now you have the optimum position in which to fall asleep. If you wake in the night in another position, just roll back into the ideal position for you. You should practice getting into the correct position with someone rubbing the muscles to ensure that you have attained the optimum sleep position for yourself.

If you can’t find the correct position on your bed, try another bed. If your mattress is too soft, worn out or too hard, you will find it difficult to find a relaxed position for your spine.

If you have any problems checking these positions, please ask us about them. Bring in your pillow(s) if you want us to check your sleep posture.

IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO BE ABLE TO SLEEP IN A RELAXED POSITION.

More tips and articles will be posted in the future, so check back!
10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags:

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Neck Aches

by Dr. Minond 21. May 2010 01:43

Neck Aches


“I have a nagging ache in my neck that seems to occur with some other minor symptoms. Should I worry about this?”


The neck contains bone, joints, tendons, ligaments, muscles, and nerves - any of which can hurt. Neck pain may also come from regions near the neck, such as the jaw, head, and shoulders. Neck stiffness can also come from pelvic problems or even dropping of the arches in your feet.


Neck problems can cause symptoms in your upper back, shoulders, or arms as well as your head and jaw. If your nerves are involved in your neck pain, you may also feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arms and possibly in your hands.


The simplest injuries are muscle strains. The most common cause of neck pain is overuse. Too many hours hunched over a steering wheel, a desk, or a book often triggers muscle strains. Neck muscles, particularly those in the back of your neck, become fatigued and eventually strained. When you overuse your neck muscles repeatedly, chronic pain can develop. Even such minor things as reading in bed or clenching your teeth can strain neck muscles.


Muscle strains are usually easy to self-diagnose. They typically come on after excessive activity or prolonged positions that put excessive strain on your neck muscles. They usually get better on their own within a day. However, if this is common, you should do something about it.


Testing may very well reveal weak or under-functioning muscles that fail to support your neck, as they should. This can lead to chronic inflammation and, in the end, arthritic changes. You should also be examined if you have:

  • Moderate to severe pain from an injury. This indicates injury to the muscles, ligaments, and possibly the discs of your neck.
  • Shooting pain. Pain radiating to your shoulder, through your shoulder blades or down your arm, or numbness or tingling in your fingers, may indicate nerve irritation.
  • Loss of strength. Weakness in an arm or a leg may also be an indication of nerve irritation.

Just like all other joints in your body, your neck joints tend to deteriorate with age. Also, if you have ever had whiplash, you are six times more likely to eventually develop arthritis in your neck.


Most neck pain, though, is associated with poor posture. The goal is to keep your head centered over your spine, so gravity works with your neck instead of against it. Some simple changes in your daily routine may help:

  • Take frequent breaks if you drive long distances or work long hours at your computer. Keep your head back, over your spine, to reduce the neck strain. Try to avoid clenching your teeth. Keep your hands lower on the steering wheel to reduce neck muscle tension.
  • Adjust your desk, chair, and computer so the monitor is at eye level. Try to have items you are referring to, like books, at an angle or elevated, so you do not have to look down. Use your chair’s armrests. Try to keep the keyboard in a position where you do not have to hold your arms up to type or use the mouse.
  • Avoid tucking the phone between your ear and shoulder when you talk. If you use the phone a lot, get a headset.
  • Stretch frequently if you work at a desk. Shrug your shoulders up and down. Pull your shoulder blades together and then relax. Pull your shoulders down while leaning your head to each side to stretch your neck muscles.
  • Balance your base. Stretching the front chest wall muscles and strengthening the muscles around the shoulder blade and back of the shoulder can promote a balanced base of support for the neck. Stand with your feet apart. Instead of crossing your arms in front of you, put one behind your lower back to help get you into the proper standing posture, this will help bring your shoulder back in to a more correct position.
  • Avoid sleeping on your stomach. That position puts stress on your neck.
  • Use a pillow that supports your neck. Pillows that are too low or too high for you cause your neck muscles to be contracted. The correct support depends on your size.

 

Applied Kinesiology is a diagnostic tool using the muscle structure of the body to aid in the examination of a patient. Its use allows immediate feedback to aid the doctor in making decisions on what type of care the patient needs.


10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.


This is Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

More tips and articles will be posted in the future,
so check back regularly!

 

10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags:

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Health

Brain Food

by Dr. Minond 11. May 2010 08:29

We have all read that we are what we eat. To some extent, we also can think as we eat. Our brain is very susceptible to imbalances in our diet. You can say “food that is good for your body is also good for your brain”. The converse is also very true.

There are over 100 billion nerve cells in the brain. For them to remain active there has to be constant level of fuel and other cofactors to ensure proper function. The brain is only 2 – 3 percent of your weight but it can need up to 20 percent of your fuel to function at a high level.

We have all seen or heard of people who seem to fade when they have not eaten. Low blood sugar causes a slow or rapid slowing of functioning in the brain. If you continue not eating, your body has to shift to destructive processes, braking down fats, to supply the energy needed to function. It is very common for short down turns in mental function to occur during these energy shifts. Likewise, studies have shown that high levels of blood sugar, like following eating a lot of sugar foods or beverages, can cause a decrease is both verbal and math skills.

A simple experiment was done using rats. They were fasted for 12 hours and then fed a choice of liquid with sucrose and other food. Within 3 days, the rats more than tripled their average intake of sugar and over a short time became addicted to the high sugar diet. Think of the classic morning breakfast that school children eat high sugared cereal with fruit juice and a small amount of milk that ironically also contains lactose, a sugar. It is no wonder that the youth of today and the last generation are overweight and there is an epidemic of type 2 diabetes. We are and become what we eat.

Other studies have shown that high fiber cereals with adequate protein to complement it, sustain mental attention and memory function in the school setting. Students given a high sugar cereal with little fiber and protein had a dramatic rise in blood sugar level and a rapid decline in mental function as the day went on.

Food choices are also important in determining our emotions. Simple sugars are not only comfort foods but are also foods that can and do affect our degree of joy, anxiety or even depression is well known.

Our brain needs a constant level of glucose a sugar to function normally. When the level goes to high or especially to low, abnormal brain function can occur. It has been documented that even dramatic personality changes can occur when the blood sugar level gets too low.

Other nutrients that are required for brain function include:

  • Proteins, especially amino acids like phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. The neurotransmitters that control our emotions are derived from these ingredients. From the amino acids serine and methionine, your brain makes acetylcholine that is essential for memory. Adequate protein intake also helps maintain a constant level of glucose in the brain.
  • Thiamine, a part of the B complex found in whole grains, legumes and nuts, is essential for proper glucose metabolism to maintain these levels in the brain.
  • The minerals iron and zinc are also essential for proper brain function.
  • Omega 3 oils, like cod liver, coconut or flaxseed oils, are essential for the formation of the nerve cell membranes and are especially important during the development of the brain. Studies have shown that mothers to be who eat low levels of omega 3 oils have children with lower IQ’s and poorer coordination skills than those who consume higher levels. Mothers only had to eat above 350 grams of fish a week to achieve these benefits.

What is the bottom line? You should eat a diet that is very low in refined sugar, has adequate protein and fat, and foods high in vitamins and minerals.

Try having three meals and two small snacks a day that follow these rules and your memory should improve or not decline.We have all read that we are what we eat. To some extent, we also can think as we eat. Our brain is very susceptible to imbalances in our diet. You can say “food that is good for your body is also good for your brain”. The converse is also very true.

There are over 100 billion nerve cells in the brain. For them to remain active there has to be constant level of fuel and other cofactors to ensure proper function. The brain is only 2 – 3 percent of your weight but it can need up to 20 percent of your fuel to function at a high level.

We have all seen or heard of people who seem to fade when they have not eaten. Low blood sugar causes a slow or rapid slowing of functioning in the brain. If you continue not eating, your body has to shift to destructive processes, braking down fats, to supply the energy needed to function. It is very common for short down turns in mental function to occur during these energy shifts. Likewise, studies have shown that high levels of blood sugar, like following eating a lot of sugar foods or beverages, can cause a decrease is both verbal and math skills.

A simple experiment was done using rats. They were fasted for 12 hours and then fed a choice of liquid with sucrose and other food. Within 3 days, the rats more than tripled their average intake of sugar and over a short time became addicted to the high sugar diet. Think of the classic morning breakfast that school children eat high sugared cereal with fruit juice and a small amount of milk that ironically also contains lactose, a sugar. It is no wonder that the youth of today and the last generation are overweight and there is an epidemic of type 2 diabetes. We are and become what we eat.

Other studies have shown that high fiber cereals with adequate protein to complement it, sustain mental attention and memory function in the school setting. Students given a high sugar cereal with little fiber and protein had a dramatic rise in blood sugar level and a rapid decline in mental function as the day went on.

Food choices are also important in determining our emotions. Simple sugars are not only comfort foods but are also foods that can and do affect our degree of joy, anxiety or even depression is well known.

Our brain needs a constant level of glucose a sugar to function normally. When the level goes to high or especially to low, abnormal brain function can occur. It has been documented that even dramatic personality changes can occur when the blood sugar level gets too low.

Other nutrients that are required for brain function include:

  • Proteins, especially amino acids like phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. The neurotransmitters that control our emotions are derived from these ingredients. From the amino acids serine and methionine, your brain makes acetylcholine that is essential for memory. Adequate protein intake also helps maintain a constant level of glucose in the brain.
  • Thiamine, a part of the B complex found in whole grains, legumes and nuts, is essential for proper glucose metabolism to maintain these levels in the brain.
  • The minerals iron and zinc are also essential for proper brain function.
  • Omega 3 oils, like cod liver, coconut or flaxseed oils, are essential for the formation of the nerve cell membranes and are especially important during the development of the brain. Studies have shown that mothers to be who eat low levels of omega 3 oils have children with lower IQ’s and poorer coordination skills than those who consume higher levels. Mothers only had to eat above 350 grams of fish a week to achieve these benefits.

What is the bottom line? You should eat a diet that is very low in refined sugar, has adequate protein and fat, and foods high in vitamins and minerals.

Try having three meals and two small snacks a day that follow these rules and your memory should improve or not decline.

10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags: , , , ,

Blog | Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Health

Aging and Exercise

by Dr. Minond 21. April 2010 01:49

Aging and Exercise

One of the most effective tools to help slow the aging process is moderate exercise. No matter when you start it, you will have positive effects on aging. The three major changes that you can feel are an increase in your strength, an increase in endurance and an increase in your range of motion. What you won’t feel is that people who exercise regularly heal from injuries faster than individuals that don’t. This finding is universal. It doesn’t matter how old you are. If you are actively exercising when you get an injury, you will heal faster than someone the same age that is not exercising.

When we age, we slowly lose the number of muscle fibers. But the size of the fibers that we have can be positively changed through exercise. One study showed that 95-year-olds increased their strength when put on a moderate exercise program geared for their age. After only 3 months, their strength increased by over 20%.

Building Endurance

Endurance, the ability to keep going, is related to muscle development and lung capacity. A 1989 study using individuals in their 70’s showed a 22% increase in lung capacity after only 6 months of exercise. Another way to say this is that after only 6 months of exercise, the 70-year-olds had the lung capacity of 50-year-olds.

Exercise does much more than increase strength and endurance. It also helps prevent osteoporosis, reduces blood pressure, aids in reducing obesity and helps prevent cardiovascular disease.

Walking Routine

The best news is that moderate exercise is almost as effective as strenuous exercise, and when it comes to injury prevention, is actually better. Ideally, start by planning your schedule to get in at least a long walk every other day. On the day you aren’t taking your long walk, try to get in a short fast walk. A walking routine like this will help your cardiovascular system and keeps your legs in shape. You should plan on some activity to exercise your arms.

Exercise Program

When choosing what exercises to do, keep this in mind: you want to prevent, or at least prolong, the effects of time. Observe how many older persons stand and walk. In general, they have lost the strength in the muscles that hold them erect. These are the muscles that run up and down our backs. Specifically, our gluteus maximus, spinal extensors, shoulder extensors and the muscles of the back of our necks.

A moderate exercise program as well as a walking or cardiovascular exercise should be part of your health maintenance program.

More tips and articles will be posted in the future, so check back!
10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags: ,

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Don't live to eat. Instead, eat to live.

by Dr. Minond 4. March 2010 01:47

One of the major changes in diet over the last few decades has been the slow increase in calories that the average person eats. We can find it everywhere. Increases in fats and sugars in the diet have resulted in not only an increase in the average weight, but also an increase in cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Think of all of the empty calories that many consume in a day. Drinks like soda contain flavorings, chemicals and sugars. They contain no vitamins, minerals or proteins.

Calorie restriction will lead to increased health and prolonging of life. One of the current theories on aging involves the relationship between insulin and glucose. As we age, improper insulin handling of glucose, or sugar causes some of the changes seen in aging. Reducing calories in your diet reduces the amount of circulating insulin. When this occurs, the cells of your body can more efficiently use glucose. Not only does calorie restriction reduce your need for insulin, but it also reduces your circulating levels of glucose. The positive effects of this also include the reduction of blood fats.

You don't have to starve yourself to attain calorie restriction. The first step is to cut out those empty calories in your diet. Start with the liquids you drink. Reduce dramatically your intake of sugared liquids and alcohol. These are empty calories with little to no redeeming value.

The next step is to look at empty calorie starches. Most breads are made from grains that have been stripped of their nutrient value. Then, the company adds back in a few vitamins and calls it enriched. The end product has less nutrient values than the original raw ingredients and it is labeled as enriched. In general, try to limit your intake of white flour products. For example, a slice of bread has the same calories as four teaspoons of sugar. Two slices of bread are the calories that are needed to run one mile. It's amazing how efficient we are.

Look closely at the fats in your diet. There are good fats and bad fats. The fats that you want to reduce are the adulterated fats like partially hydrogenated oils and animal fats. Most of the fast food baked goods and store bought salad dressings are made from partially hydrogenated fats. Margarine is another example of partially hydrogenated fat. These cause imbalances in hormone type substances called prostaglandins.

The final area to look at is your intake of animal fats. Make sure that any meat that you eat has been thoroughly trimmed of all fat and all skin has been removed.

Basically, if you restrict your intake of empty calorie drinks, reduce or eliminate empty calorie breads, pastas and baked goods and reduce or eliminate bad fats, you will have a reduced calorie diet that will lead to a thinner and healthier you.

WHAT DO I EAT? The answer is a diet filled with fruits, grains and vegetables supplemented with low fat proteins and adequate amounts of essential fatty acids.

If you feel like a snack, first think about what you ate at your last meal. Meals high in empty calories will cause a release of insulin and a rebound later that makes you hungry.

If you have any doubts about your diet, write down everything you eat and drink for a week as well as the times of day you eat. Bring this to the office and we can talk about your diet. Moderate changes can have amazing effects on your health.

More tips and articles will be posted in the future, so check back!
10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags: , ,

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Trans Fatty Acids and Cholesterol

by Dr. Minond 21. February 2010 01:45

What Everyone Should Know about Trans Fatty Acids and Cholesterol

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are trans fatty acids?
A: Trans fatty acids are fats that are found in food such as vegetable shortening, margarines, crackers, candies, baked goods, cookies, snack foods, fried foods, salad dressings and most processed foods.

Q: Why should I care about trans fat?
A: Because there is a direct, proven relationship between diets high in trans fat content and LDL cholesterol levels. This relates directly to an increased level of bad cholesterol. Elevated cholesterol in your body increases your chance of getting heart disease more so than in those individuals who have a healthy cholesterol level. Over time, bad cholesterol can build up on the walls of the arteries that carry blood to your heart and brain.

Q: What is cholesterol?
A: Cholesterol is a waxy material found in all parts of your body. It is used to make your cells, some hormones and vitamin D. It’s sources is two-fold: your body makes it and the foods you eat contain it. Your liver makes all the cholesterol your body needs.

Q: Aren’t all fats bad?
A: No. There are good fats and bad fats. Similarly, there exists good and bad blood cholesterol. Saturated fats and trans fat have bad effects on cholesterol levels. Polyunsaturated fats and monosaturated fats (such as olive oil, soybean oil and corn oil) have good effects. Good cholesterol (HDL) takes the bad cholesterol out of your blood and keeps it from building up in your arteries. Bad cholesterol (LDL) makes cholesterol build up on the walls of your arteries and increases your chances of heart disease and strokes.

Q: How much trans fat is too much?
A: Research studies are currently underway to try and determine this. However, it is accurate to say that the less saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol consumed, the better. Trans fat, while pervasive in many of the foods that you may choose to eat, is NOT essential to a healthy diet.

Q: How can consumers know if a product contains trans fat if it’s not identified on the nutrition label?
A: Consumers can know if a food contains trans fat by looking at the ingredients list on the food label. If the ingredients list includes the words shortening, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil or hydrogenated vegetable oil, the food contains trans fat. Ingredients are listed in descending order of predominance, smaller amounts are present when the ingredients is close to the end of the list.

Q: What can I do to lower my cholesterol levels?
A: Here are several ways to lower your cholesterol levels thereby helping lower your chance of heart disease:

  • Eat foods with less fat, saturated fat and cholesterol and avoid trans fats.
  • Take off the skin and fat from meat, poultry and fish.
  • Broil, bake, roast or poach instead of frying foods.
  • Eat lots of fruits, whole grains and vegetables every day.
  • Eat less sausage, bacon, salami, bologna, any fatty sandwich meat, whole milk, cheese, butter and avoid partially hydrogenated oils.
  • Read food labels to learn how much fat is in the food you eat. Also look for the amount of trans fats, saturated fat and cholesterol in food.
  • Get plenty of exercise every day. Some examples of good ways to exercise include walking, yard work, housework, dancing, aerobic dance, running, swimming, jumping rope and bicycling.
  • Lose weight if you are overweight.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Talk to us about tailoring a program that is right for you.
More tips and articles will be posted in the future, so check back!
10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags: ,

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Low Back Pain

by Dr. Minond 15. February 2010 16:40

One of the major problems we have today is when acute back pain becomes chronic. When symptoms last seven weeks or more, the condition is considered chronic. Chronic low back pain is the number one cause of disability in the working population and recovery to pre-injury status for chronic low back pain diminishes when time passes.

Low back pain, resulting in prolonged disability, is the most prevalent and costly work-related problem in most industries. Yet, despite its prevalence most low back pain has no identifiable cause. Most of these patients have had extensive testing including MRI’s or CAT scans looking for a disc protrusion or tear that would explain the chronic pain they are experiencing. In most cases, these tests only reveal aging of the spine, and arthritis. There are many theories, but no supporting data to prove them. One of the major problems is that many practitioners take only one aspect of the patient’s problem into account when planning a treatment program. Back pain has many causes and is usually mutifactorial in origin and will need a mutifactorial approach in therapy.

The successful treatment of chronic back pain usually involves therapies to multiple tissues. For example, the muscles in the area of pain will show changes. Some may be weak and not supporting you properly while others are shortened or over contracting. The ligaments that bind your bones together can be normal functioning or they may be short, overly tight, or weak and flaccid. The fascia, the shiny covering that covers the muscles, like a suitcase, can be tighter than normal and require treatment. The individual bones and joints can be misaligned or locked up irritating different types of nerves causing pain, ache and reflex muscle function. In addition to all this, you may have inflammation in the area due to tissue damage, which can add to the chemical stress in the area.

Our bodies are like a house in some ways. We need a stabile base. The walls should be straight and the roof should be on level. When the base or foundation of the house sinks, the walls become crooked, the windows don’t open right, and the roof changes and leaks. Most chronic back pain begins with a change in our foundation. The proper alignment and functioning of our pelvis and lower spine are critical to form the base for proper spinal function.

It used to be thought that bed rest was the most important factor in treating back pain. Over the last few years, the importance of motion has been discovered. Movement allows for normal healing of the injured structures and increases the circulation into and out of the areas that have been damaged. Consequently, one of the first goals is to get you moving properly. That means walking and standing without pain or ache.

Back pain makes you stand in awkward positions to try and avoid it. Unfortunately, the positions you get into many times makes you worse. There is a reason that people feel comfortable in crazy positions. They are contorting themselves to avoid ache or pain, but in doing so the problem becomes more ingrained.

Early treatment is fast and effective. The longer the time from injury to initiation of treatment, the more chronic and harder the condition is to treat, and the potential is there for a degree of permanent disability to occur.

Steps to prevent back pain:

  • Exercise regularly to keep back muscles strong and flexible. The exercise should include some stretching.
  • Use the correct lifting techniques (lift all objects close to your body and avoid twisting, bending forward, or reaching while lifting).
  • Maintain proper body weight and avoid smoking.
  • Maintain proper posture when standing or sitting.

Although back pain is common, it's also quite possible for you to prevent most back problems with simple steps such as exercise and adopting new ways to sit and stand. Even if you've injured your back before, you can learn techniques to help avoid recurrent injuries.

In our office, we are interested not only in finding the cause of your back pain, but also helping you to develop good preventative measures to ward off your next bout with this problem.

If 80% of Americans have problems with their back, don’t be surprised if you are one of them. Work with us to help you develop good patterns of stretching, exercise and posture to minimize your chances of another “attack”.


 

Applied Kinesiology is a diagnostic tool using the muscle structure of the body to aid in the examination of a patient. Its use allows immediate feedback to aid the doctor in making decisions on what type of care the patient needs.


10 Downing Street #1U
(Entrance on 6th Ave.)
New York, NY 10014
718-930-0662
By Appointment Only
© Michael Minond.

This is
Dr. Michael Minond’s newsletter. None of the content above is meant to diagnose or treat any condition or disease. If you have any symptoms, or are concerned about any condition you may have, please consult your physician or Dr. Minond. If you would like to no longer receive Dr. Minond’s newsletter please reply to this email and your email address will be removed.

Tags: ,

Chiropractic | Dr. Minond | Healing | Health

Minond Blogs

Different writings by different Minonds.

Calendar

<<  July 2014  >>
MoTuWeThFrSaSu
30123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031123
45678910

View posts in large calendar